Education

Amy Snyder, Executive Director, teaching students lessons from the Holocaust.

Amy Snyder, Executive Director, teaching students lessons from the Holocaust.

Overview

The mission of the Holocaust Museum goes beyond the teaching of the Holocaust as history to its relevance for us today. Knowing about this watershed event from the past is essential to building a foundation for action in the present.

Our Educational programming begins with the Holocaust and ends with connections to what has happened in the lifetime of the students and what they can do to make a difference. Respect for others begins with their family and community, then extends out to those in need around the world.

Anne Frank wrote in her diary in April of 1944, “If God lets me live… I’ll make my voice heard… I will work in the world and for mankind.” Even though Anne died during the Holocaust, her diary has allowed millions of people to experience some of her life and she has made her voice heard all over the world.

Why Teach the Holocaust?

Amy Snyder, Executive Director, explains lessons from the Holocaust.

Amy Snyder, Executive Director, explains lessons from the Holocaust.

In 1994, a Holocaust Bill was passed in the State of Florida, which mandated the teaching of Holocaust instruction in grades K – 12. The Commissioner of Education created a Task Force on Holocaust Education and appointed members to serve on the Commission. The Task Force serves as an advisory group to the Commissioner of Education and coordinates Holocaust education activities on his behalf.  The Holocaust Museum & Education Center of Southwest Florida has been a member of the Task Force since 2006.  To read more about the Task Force and access the State of Florida curriculum, please visit www.flholocausteducationtaskforce.org.

A careful study of the Holocaust allows investigation into historical fact and evidence, human behavior, cause and consequence, as well as many other aspects of education.  Understanding the events of the Holocaust can give us an historical perspective that helps us deal with issues of today.

Students exploring Museum exhibits

Students exploring Museum exhibits

What Do I Teach?

In deciding what to teach, a teacher should first decide what he/she hopes to accomplish in a study of the Holocaust and genocide.  Therefore, the first step is to create a rationale statement for the unit of study.  Once one has crafted a rationale statement, the scope of information and types of activities becomes more finite.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C. has designed guidelines for teaching about the Holocaust.  There are 14 recommended methodologies to take into consideration while designing a Holocaust curriculum.  Please visit www.ushmm.org/education/foreducators for more information.

What Teacher Training Opportunities are Available?

The Holocaust Museum will offer one professional development seminar each quarter.  Each seminar will use the collections of the Museum and the Echoes & Reflections multimedia curriculum as the core, but will also address creative ways to share this history with students.

Echoes & Reflections was developed by Yad Vashem, The Anti-Defamation League and The Shoah Foundation at USC.  This mulitmedia curriculum is designed to give educators a comprehensive format for teaching the Holocaust.  Upon completion of each session, participants will receive a complimentary copy of the curriculum, as well as other resources used during the session.

Students created tribute tiles to commemorate Holocaust victims.

Students created tribute tiles to commemorate Holocaust victims.

 

To learn more about workshops or to receive an application, please send an e-mail request to Sam Parish or Amy Snyder.

sam@holocaustmuseumswfl.org or amy@holocaustmuseumswfl.org

Field Trips and Outreach Programs

The Holocaust Museum & Education Center of Southwest Florida reaches more than 15,000 students yearly with on-site and outreach education programs.  Using the Museum’s collection, personal stories and hands-on activities, the education programs explore the history of the Holocaust and its relevance for us today.

For more information on Teacher Training Seminars and Educational Programs, please contact Sam Parish at 239-263-9200 ext. 206 or sam@holocaustmuseumswfl.org

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